Working on movement with the projections has been fun. I’ve been dancing in response to music which trigger certain emotions - whether this be instrumental or of a song that I used to listen to when I lived in the countryside, etc. This feeling of nostalgia and what that means through movement.
I am still really unsure of what to wear when dancing in front of the projections. At the moment I’ve been wearing black shorts and a grey vest, just because they’re comfy and breathable, but they’re not the most aesthetically pleasing when I look back at photographs or footage.
This particular night, I projected the image onto the metal shutters at the front of Two Queens Gallery. It kind of broke down the image into a grid, which I kind of liked since the images are so linear.  
It took me a while to get into the rhythm and comfortable. It took me around 20 minutes to actually start loosening up and considering movement, but in an improvised way and regulating my breathing and becoming more aware of that.
More practice and research is needed when considering my positioning and placement in response to the space and the images being projected.

Working on movement with the projections has been fun. I’ve been dancing in response to music which trigger certain emotions - whether this be instrumental or of a song that I used to listen to when I lived in the countryside, etc. This feeling of nostalgia and what that means through movement.

I am still really unsure of what to wear when dancing in front of the projections. At the moment I’ve been wearing black shorts and a grey vest, just because they’re comfy and breathable, but they’re not the most aesthetically pleasing when I look back at photographs or footage.

This particular night, I projected the image onto the metal shutters at the front of Two Queens Gallery. It kind of broke down the image into a grid, which I kind of liked since the images are so linear.  

It took me a while to get into the rhythm and comfortable. It took me around 20 minutes to actually start loosening up and considering movement, but in an improvised way and regulating my breathing and becoming more aware of that.

More practice and research is needed when considering my positioning and placement in response to the space and the images being projected.

Artist Statement - ‘Repugnance’

My current work investigates the ideas of Jean-Paul Sartre, a French philosopher and key figure in the philosophy of existentialism; finding particular interest in his novel ‘Nausea’. In ‘Nausea’, Sartre explores the theories of existential angst – the main character shares his disgust towards existence, self-hatred and near-insanity; searching anxiously for meaning in all the things that had filled and fulfilled his life up to that point. The character comes to a revelation into the nature of his being when he faces the troublesomely provisional and limited nature of existence itself.

This investigation has lead me to devise a performance art piece using costume, digital projection, movement, sound and video titled ‘Repugnance’.

Artist Statement for ‘Repugnance’:
Wearing clothing that envelopes the body, transforming it into something heavy, strange and obscured, the artist moves in front of a projected video of familiar landscapes. As the landscape and the physical form begin to intermix, the boundaries between the physical being and the space it inhabits become blurred. Through the utilisation of light, sound and movement, a process of understanding and translation takes place. Repeated gestures become an organized system of communication; yet the performance hangs between order and chaos, existence and nothingness. Over a period of physical and mental endurance, the repetitive actions create a delimited space for the expression of thoughts and emotions.

‘Repugnance’ is still in its early stages of creation and currently I am collaborating with two textile artists, Geraldine Chenery and Nadia Kelly to produce the costume for this piece.